Following on from the other cctv thread

Channel Hopper

Channel Hopper

Suffering fools, so you don't have to.
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29,888
My Satellite Setup
A little less analogue, and a lot more crap.
My Location
UK
which is now at 23+ pages, a comparison of the standalone cameras purchased in the past month, Floureon and Anran brands, though the latter did come with other names on the shell and seller promotion.

First up some pictures of the exteriors and from the SD card insert underneath both cameras. From first inspection the PCBs look virtually identical, with the reset switches in the same position, even though the Anran model has a second external reset built into the connector cabling.
 

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Channel Hopper

Channel Hopper

Suffering fools, so you don't have to.
Staff member
Messages
29,888
My Satellite Setup
A little less analogue, and a lot more crap.
My Location
UK
Pricing - both were close to £30 including a two day delivery within the UK.

The Anran is a metal case throughout, apart from the plastic screwed on SD card cover, the Floureon is all plastic moulding and about half the weight, with SD card slot being flip/clip open type, like a remote control with no security screws. This probably explains why the latter is held onto the wall with two screws and the Anran with three.

Both have their own generic 12v PSU, but the Floureon also comes with an extender cable, which is very useful where you need to drill into a blind cavity further way from a mains outlet.

On both cameras I have connected using the wireless system, though each has socketry for the LAN cable in the attatched lead. The Anran has a single detachable aerial, the Floureon has two non removeable adjustables on the case.
 
Channel Hopper

Channel Hopper

Suffering fools, so you don't have to.
Staff member
Messages
29,888
My Satellite Setup
A little less analogue, and a lot more crap.
My Location
UK
Fitting of both is very straightforward, drill hole through wall for power cable, or power and ethernet (or as I have managed to do, enlarge the hole sufficiently to include the connector blocks as well to save strapping them underneath the chassis - see later though).

Then drill the two / three holes for the securing around the hole and bolt up using the inserts and screws, then align approximately to the right position with tilt and swivel bracket before nipping up with the included allen key.

Fine adjustement to get the exact position is then done by using a tablet or mobile, downloading the correct app for the camera (though there are many that seem to work on each), plugging in the camera waiting for a minute or two, looking for the wifi signal from the camera and then activating the app to check for the camera output, in glorious high definition. At this point you can fine tune the camera to the exact position and lock up all bolts. Add SD card if you wish to record locally, then you can take the ladders down as everything next can be done indoors in the warm

What is slightly worrying is the SD card slot gives access directly to the PCB and other internals of the camera, despite the specifications of each claiming IP66 ratings (dust and high pressure water from all directions) but this is clearly not the case (sic). I can see humidity and eventually corrosion from the daily changes in temperature getting into the cameras, with only the heat from the lighting and circuitry as a possible way of drying them out.

The specifications of the Anran camera mentions operational temperature limits of 20C to -60C, so next summer might also bring up a few issues.
 
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